Google hits its most creative internal incubator hard: half of ‘Area 120’ projects are canceled

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.Sundar Pichai had already said at the Code Conference a week ago that Google needed to increase its efficiency. The CEO of Google even put a figure on the table stating that Google needed to increase said efficiency by 20%. To do this, the company cuts the budget for internal projects and a big blow falls on an ‘Area 120’ that sees its projects cut in half.

From 14 to 7 projects in a single ad

From this ‘Area 120’ of Google, which as we said is one of its most prolific internal incubators, we have seen the birth of projects and experiments such as ‘Reply’, ‘Stack’ or ‘Keep’. Not all of them have been successful after their launch, it must be said, but until now they had been proving their usefulness in certain areas. The last known was called ‘Checks’ and was intended for Android developers.

With ‘Checks’, Google’s ‘Area 120’ launched a project aimed at being able to carry out an automatic analysis of the privacy of applications. A system would be created so that programmers could check whether your apps comply with all applicable privacy policies. Good at that time, good with future changes in them.

We do not know if ‘Checks’ is among the ‘Area 120’ projects that have survived the company’s hack. What we do know is that Google announced last Tuesday, September 13, to the members of the cancellations incubator. And also that employees without a project they must find a new position within Google before the end of next January. Or they will be fired.

Among the projects being canceled is Qaya, a web storefront creation service. Climate projects, a financial accounting project based on Google Sheets and even an analysis project for augmented and virtual reality are also falling. As reported by TechCrunch, the incubator would have gone from having 170 employees to just 100. 70 employees, therefore, have to find a new job at Google. Or a new company.

Via | TechCrunch